Posted Monday, February 25th, 2019

County Heritage Commission to Unveil Historic Marker and Panels in Historic Irish-American Immigrant Neighborhood in Morristown

In partnership with the Morris County Heritage Commission, the Friendly Sons of St. Patrick of Morris County will hold a special ceremony on the afternoon of Sunday, March 3, to honor one of Morristown’s earliest immigrant neighborhoods: Dublin – Morristown’s Historic Irish Neighborhood.Friendly Sons of St. Patrick badge

County residents are invited to join in the festivities at 1:30 pm at the corner of Madison Street and Macculloch Avenue, where they will learn about the enclave that nurtured generations of Irish immigrants and their descendants for more than 100 years in Morris County.

The neighborhood has been featured in two works published by the Morristown & Morris Township Library: Greeting the Past, A Walking Tour of the Dublin Neighborhood, and Ordinary Days, Extraordinary Times: Morristown New Jersey’s Immigrant Past.

Freeholder Kathy DeFillippo“I thank the Heritage Commission for working closely with the Friendly Sons of St. Patrick on a project that helps educate county residents on the important historical and cultural impact made on Morris County by Irish immigrants,’’ said Freeholder Kathy DeFillippo, who is liaison to the Heritage Commission.

At the March 3 event, the Friendly Sons of St. Patrick of Morris County, NJ will unveil a Dublin Neighborhood historical marker and two interpretive panels funded by a grant from the Morris County Heritage Commission.

Speakers will include Morristown Mayor Timothy Dougherty, Morris County Heritage Commission Acting Director Peg Shultz, and Rev. Msgr. John Hart, author Cheryl Turkington. Freeholders DeFillippo and Doug Cabana will join in unveiling the marker and panels.

The Guard Pipes & Drums then will lead a short procession to the Dublin Pub in Morristown for a celebration beginning at 2:30 p.m.

A Cultural Impact Statement written for the Friendly Sons by author Cheryl Turkington, as part of a grant application to the county Heritage Commission, provides historical details about the Dublin Neighborhood. The following is an excerpt:

“Morristown’s Dublin neighborhood is a rare surviving example of a 19th Century ethnic enclave that nurtured generations of Irish immigrants who lived, worked, raised families and contributed to their community in countless ways.

“Located a few blocks south of the Morristown Green, the area is comprised of parts of Maple and Macculloch avenues, Green Street, Catherine Lane, and Madison and James streets.

“The backbone and guiding light of the neighborhood was the Church of the Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary, which was built in 1848 near the corner of Madison Street and Maple Avenue.

“For almost 100 years, the vast majority of residents were Irish-Catholic, and the church and neighborhood grew together seamlessly – their identities so intertwined that residents could not envision one without the other.

The streetscape today retains many key elements of its historical context. Walking these streets yields a sense of the scale and quality of a long-ago immigrant experience.’’

Special Event on Sunday (March 3) to Mark Morris County's Irish-American Heritage

Historical Marker Wording:

Dublin

Between 1840 and 1950, This Neighborhood

Was a Center of Irish Immigrant Life.

Residents Worked as Laborers, Domestic Help,

Merchants and Civil Servants

Later Generations Were Elected to Public

Office and Served in the Armed Forces In

Large Numbers. Community Members Helped

Establish All Souls Hospital in 1892.

For more information in Morris County’s Irish community, visit: https://fsspmorriscounty.com/

Special Event on Sunday (March 3) to Mark Morris County's Irish-American Heritage